the further adventures of

Mike Pirnat

a leaf on the wind

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Rey & Kylo's Greatest Hits, Volume 2

One post wasn't enough to contain all of the Praetorian Guard fight mashups that I made over the weekend, so here's volume 2. As with part one, this post is chock-a-block full of spoilers for The Last Jedi-- you have been warned!


After getting a bit of sleep, I jumped back into mashup action on Sunday, opening with a selection inspired by my college friend and once-upon-a-time radio show buddy Genevieve Mathieson, currently celebrating her 20th year on-air. (Seriously, check out her show, it's awesome!) She opens every installment with this gem:

Here, I really like how the change-ups in the medley fit so nicely with the transitions between the "chapters" of the battle. I can't help but smile.


That got me thinking of my on-air days of yore, and a song that my friend Marie Vibbert introduced me to during the very first episode of my show, and which always delights me when it crops up (as it did in last year's Baby Driver).

There's a nice little guitar note just as Snoke is being cut in half, followed quickly by a great connection with Rey catching the saber. The first saber hits of the battle match up well enough, and then the party really gets started. This almost feels like something in between the "Thunderstruck" and "March of the Pigs" videos to me. Overall the "chapter" shifts do pretty well here too.


I had seen a few requests for Queen's "Princes of the Universe" by this point but without any videos, so I figured I might as well do one.

The lyrics here are kind of... interesting when juxtaposed with the visuals. Clearly they are both "fighting to survive, in a war with the darkest powers" as well as "fighting and free". But a major point of The Last Jedi is that Rey isn't from special lineage, and isn't part of some grand destiny, so the claims of being "born to be kings" and having "blood of kings" run somewhat counter to this premise. I ascribe all the lyrics here to Kylo Ren's perspective, like an internal narration. There's sort of a fun double meaning at play that I really like a lot--just as Freddie Mercury sings "no man can be my equal" we get a zoom-in on Rey, who, like Éowyn in Return of the King, is indeed no man.

Visually, things line up pretty well overall, with especially good chapter divisions, and the "blood" line landing right on the shredder gag.

I'm pretty disappointed that there are so few views of this one--just three at the time of writing, compared to over seven thousand of the Hamilton one, and I think they're all me making sure it uploaded okay.


I really like mid to late 90s industrial music, so Rammstein's "Du Hast" seemed like a pretty good idea.

Lyrically, there's already a double meaning at work: "du hast" functions as both "you hate" and part of a line that translates as "you asked me and I said nothing," lines which tap deeply into the context of the scene. Everyone is dealing with hatreds, and Rey and Kylo had just asked each other to abandon their old allegiances and turn. The lyrics go on to challenge whether they will be faithful until parted by death, answering with a resounding and repeated "no!" that to me encapsulates their turbulent, transient alliance.

Lots of visuals line up well here; I especially like the cuts between Rey and Kylo before the battle starts, and the way the crunchy guitars enter just as the melee begins. As a nice bonus, the sort of angelic backing vocals line up perfectly with moments when Rey is yelling.


"Du Hast" got me into playing with Rey and Kylo Ren's relationship, so what if maybe they were a couple on the verge of a breakup (which they kind of are)?

I imagine this as Kylo Ren trying to convince Rey to stay, offering up banal platitudes like "I guess I was wrong" while they do terrible battle with the forces of darkness and the world burns around them ("and we're falling apart"). I like weird juxtaposition a lot, is what I'm saying.

Visually there's a lot of good timing again here; this one continues to make me happy.


I had seen many suggestions for The Proclaimers, so I stayed with 90s rom-com edits with "I'm Gonna Be (500 Miles)":

It's overall just silly fun, with some good alignment in places; the "ta la ta" bits are especially well placed to me. I enjoy the juxtaposition of Kylo Ren pledging to "dream about the time when I'm with you" as he murders the hell out of a guard, as if this whole thing is like his idea of a really awesome date.


The delightfully inappropriate juxtaposition of The Proclaimers reminded me of the classic reimagining of The Shining as a romantic comedy, and so I quickly flashed onto Peter Gabriel's "Solsbury Hill" that was featured in the Shining video, wondering if it would work in this context too.

Overall I'd say it's pretty successful, with a lot of the action lining up decently. In particular, Kylo Ren's triple-hit guard kill at the 1:47 mark seems to really connect to the music well.

My favorite coincidence here is getting Peter Gabriel singing "which connections I should cut" with "cut" landing exactly as Snoke is sliced in half.

This one also has tragically few views, so give it a spin and see what you think.


Taking a quick detour from rom-com treatments, I remembered the Michael W. Smith instrumental "Ashton" that I'd been obsessed with in high school, a piece that always got me revved up and made me yearn for the perfect visuals to go with it. I'm reasonably sure that at one point I daydreamed extensively about how it really needed something like a lightsaber fight. Decades later, Rian Johnson has finally delivered. Thanks, Rian!


I wasn't done playing with the Rey/Kylo Ren relationship; inspired by the "Emo Kylo Ren" Twitter account, I started playing with some of my favorite songs by The Cure. I couldn't quite get "Just Like Heaven" to work, and "Lovesong" didn't feel right, but then I got a little more into Ren's head and "Why Can't I Be You" seemed perfect: tapping into a mix of obsession and jealousy that seemed absolutely authentic for Kylo Ren. Secretly--and totally obviously to the audience--he wishes he could be as powerful and amazing as the lovely nobody whose sudden appearance in his life has shaken him to the core.

There's an urgency to the music that pairs really nicely with the scene, I think, and lots of good bits of action that connect well.

At the time of writing, this one is also under-appreciated on views, which is a shame, because I think it explores some interesting territory.


I was on a little bit of a roll with the 80s music/obsessive romance thing, so Depeche Mode seemed like a good next step. I chose a reworked version of "Enjoy the Silence" for the slightly industrial edge to it; I think it pairs better with the battle scene than the original version would.

Things that make me happy here include but are not limited to the lightsaber landing in Rey's hand as we get "here, in my arms", the start of the melee, Rey skewering a guard as the lyrics get to "pain", the guard getting shredded on "harm", "in my arms" as the guard grapples Kylo Ren, and the two syllables of "wanted" as Rey takes down her final opponent.

Moreover, I think this works so well because Rey and Kylo's entire negotiation and agreement before the battle takes place wordlessly. "Words are very unnecessary, they can only do harm."


Still in the 80s, I took things for a silly turn, casting the fight as the ending chase sequence from Ferris Bueller's Day Off. Pretty much no one knows the actual title of the song that plays as Ferris dashes through people's back yards as he tries to beat his parents home, so this has a pitifully small number of views so far.


I had started on this next one during the Saturday night binge, but wasn't quite getting it working due to an audio edit dilemma, so I thought I was just going to scrap it. Fortunately, my daughter came along the next day and encouraged me to finish it, so with her help we got it to a reasonable place.

This is the only video so far where I've messed with the audio at all, making a splice from the opening of the song into a spot near the end so that the transition into the start of the battle would be right.

From a timing standpoint, I love the "D-I-Y" matching up with the first saber strikes. Stay to the end for another fun shredder gag.

This has long been one of my favorite KMFDM songs, and I come back to it often when I need a dose of challenge-smashing self confidence. To me personally, "do or die" is metaphorical--the death of soul or spirit if I let myself succumb to whatever is eating at me--but here in the Star Wars universe it is quite literal. As a bonus, I think Yoda would agree: "do or do not; there is no try."


Finally we come to where I stopped for now, having to get back to life with my family and a return to the work week.

I've really fallen hard for this track over the past year or so, and I get chills from having it paired with this fight scene.

I'll let it speak for itself.


I have some ideas for others, so I might do a few more soon, though the meme seems to have died down over the past day. I've stopped getting new attention on the Hamilton video, which seems like a sign that this might be over for now.

The whole process was a lot of fun, though, scratching a creative and performative itch that has been nagging me off and on since the demise of Turntable.fm, so I'm grateful to have been able to enjoy the ride while it lasted.

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Rey & Kylo's Greatest Hits

Disclaimer: This self-indulgent post mainly serves as a way to collect a bunch of silliness into a single place for convenience, while also offering a platform for extra context--a sort of "director's commentary" if you will. It also contains MAJOR HELLA SPOILERS OF DOOM for The Last Jedi. Proceed with caution!


It started so innocently.

While skimming Twitter on Saturday, I ran across the start of the thread that quickly came to dominate my waking--and should-be-sleeping--hours:

I saw that people had started making their own in response and I couldn't resist. I had to get in on the fun. I skimmed through to see what had already been done, cast about for a few ideas, and then made this:

Fun fact: I almost started working with "Yorktown" instead, but suddenly I realized that after this battle, there are no witnesses to what occurred in Snoke's chamber. Literally NO ONE ELSE WAS IN THE ROOM WHERE IT HAPPENED!

My first attempts at this mashup had stronger timing for the opening beats as Rey catches the lightsaber, but adjusting things to gee the "click/boom" payoff was worth the sacrifice.


After rendering that out and getting it tweeted, I was flush with excitement and ready to make one that would channel how pumped I was feeling. I was also starting to feel some time pressure since I had social plans to get to. Enter "Thunderstruck":

I was really happy with how the timing worked out here. Besides getting the "thun-der" synced with the opening lightsaber strikes, it also timed perfectly with the cut to the wide shot of Snoke and the twitch of Kylo Ren's fingers that summons the blade, the red light on Kylo's face as he ignites his own saber, and the cut to the wide shot as Rey and Kylo pivot into battle. I also like how the "ahhs" in the opening match up to Rey shots. In general there are some good places where beats line up with saber strikes and sparks, which make me really happy.

Lyrically, I like how "what could I do?" lines up with Rey being caught by the guard just before she skewers him, and the "yeah" as Kylo Ren makes a guard-kabob of his own. I do wish that "tore me apart" was a little closer to the guard being shredded, but one can't have everything, especially when the "you've been... thunderstruck!" connects so perfectly to Rey's saber drop.


I came back from visiting friends and was both sad and happy that no one had made my next idea, which feels like it should have been more obvious: "Battle Without Honor or Humanity," AKA "that song from Kill Bill."

There's some more good timing here: Snoke getting chopped, the cut from Kylo to Rey, and especially the opening saber strikes, as it turns out there's a third hit where Kylo's saber connects with the ground, giving a satisfying payoff to the "bam-BAM-bam!" Lots and lots of the melee hits line up on strong beats; there are some particularly fun moments with Kylo just before and as he's grappled that are really delicious, and we get a pretty decent effect for Rey's saber drop.


I was still feeling the Kill Bill vibe, so my next pick was "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood":

I love this song for a sword battle, but I also love how it plays with the who's-going-to-turn psychology of the scene. It's probably funnier to consider the lyrics as being Kylo Ren's point of view, and I adore how his face lights up red just as the lyrics get us "seem to be bad."

Once more we get good beats on saber strikes and Kylo being grappled, and a good sync with the guard being shredded, but my particular favorite bit is how the music goes with Rey being reeled in by the guard. I also like the "oh, Lord" as Kylo scans the room, the brass riff during Kylo's pirouette around the 1:44 mark, and the strings as Rey throws her saber to Kylo.


Next I wanted to connect with the raw energy and chaos of the opening of the melee, and nothing says that to me quite like "March of the Pigs" off of The Downward Spiral:

I enjoy the synth kicking in just as Rey rises into the frame, and it meshes nicely with the cuts back and forth between Rey and Kylo before the battle, but what makes this for me is the "step right up!" as the guards approach and the guitar kicking in on those first saber hits, and the chaos of the start of the fight.


I love Styx's "Come Sail Away" without a trace of irony, so I had to do it at some point:

I chose this mainly to get the electric guitars to drop in as the melee starts, but there are plenty of good saber hits, Rey's skewer-and-toss with is nicely accompanied, and I like how the gag with the shredder works here. Lyrically, I love Rey and Kylo Ren coming together to "try, best that we can, to carry on!" though Yoda might admonish them about whether or not there is a "try."


Fun fact: "Come Sail Away" was released in 1977, just like Star Wars! Since I had just steeped in the above nostalgia, and since Star Wars is about heroism, it seemed fitting to pick up another classic tune from 1977, David Bowie's "Heroes":

I read the lyrics here as Kylo Ren talking to Rey about their doomed relationship. "You will be queen" as Rey rises up, "nothing will drive them away" as the guards close in... "We can be heroes," opines Kylo Ren, but alas, "just for one day." Nothing can keep them together.


Around the time that I posted "Heroes", I saw that someone had done "Gangnam Style", which popped me out of the nostalgia and straight into internet meme territory, and I simply had to do "The Fox":

Sadly the video clip isn't long enough to accommodate the full first verse, but that's made up for by "frog goes croak" as Kylo cuts Snoke in half (because "ha ha, double meanings LOL"). Also Snoke's torso hits the deck right on "toot," which makes me giggle. I mainly timed this around getting "fox say" to match the first saber strikes, and I'm very amused by how each of the fox noise segments line up with different parts of the fight. The shredder gag makes a decent showing ("your fur is red, so beautiful"). I do wish that the last "what does the fox say" had lined up better with Rey's saber drop move--ideally I'd have "fox" on the knee swing and "say" on the headshot.


It's gotten way too late, so I'll have to follow this up with a second installment to cover the rest. Until then... May the Force be with you!

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PyCon 2018 & 2019 Dates

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Since I've been asked a few times about the dates for the upcoming PyCons in my lovely city of Cleveland, Ohio, and there is surprisingly little about it in Google results, and I wouldn't mind an SEO bump, here is the scoop, along with photographic proof from the closing keynote of PyCon 2017:

As usual the first two days should be tutorials, followed by three days of conference proper, and finally four days of sprints.

I hope to see you there!

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Daypack Shootout: North Face Borealis vs. Osprey Quasar

Once upon a time in 2016, I was getting ready for my first trip to the United Kingdom, and I found myself in need of a proper daypack. It would need to not be awful to carry through airports, manage a laptop, a small camera, and limited supplies like a water bottle and small snacks, stow a light jacket, hold some modest souvenirs that the kiddo would inevitably insist on, and stand up to the springtime rains. Bonus points would be awarded for not looking horrible or presenting me as a theft target. I spent a week or so agonizing over online research and eventually narrowed the field to two final and very similar contenders: Borealis by The North Face and Quasar by Osprey. I ordered both from Amazon and spent an evening doing an in-depth comparison, the results of which, dear reader, are at long last yours to behold.

Buckle up--there's going to be a lot of pictures.

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So that's the Quasar on the left and the Borealis on the right. Both bags are 28 liters and are remarkably similar to one another.

Both bags feature a bungee cord for external storage of things you might want easy access to. The Quasar's matches the rest of the bag, for a more subtle look, while the Borealis offers a splash of color (and in fact comes in a nearly ridiculous number of available colors).

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Both bags were easily capable of corralling a light jacket that I jammed in not very neatly for a quick test, giving me confidence that they could support my layering needs. I really didn't want to wear a wet rain jacket indoors, so this external, easily accessible storage was a huge win for me.

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Both bags terminate this cord with a little plastic hook that you can attach to this webbing to keep things nice and neat. The Quasar's hook is a little larger and seemed both more robust and easier to work with. I also preferred the mechanism on the Quasar that's used to adjust the tightness of the web.

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Both bags fit a modest water bottle with ease in the stretchy side pockets. But we have a major point of differentiation here: the Borealis has only one compression strap per side, while the Quasar has two. On the Borealis, the compression strap and its hardware interfere with the top of my bottle, while on the Quasar the bottom strap goes over the outside of the pocket (meaning you can over-tighten it and make the pocket difficult), and the top compression strap is far out of the way. Points here (for me at least) go again to the Quasar.

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The side pockets are also a great place for an umbrella--another late March London necessity. This also gives us another look at the placement of those compression straps.

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The Borealis has a little molle strap sewn into three segments that you can use to hook stuff onto the bag. The Quasar has two mount points featuring a sort of rubber tube. I kind of liked the molle material better, and it was easier to clip things on there, but I can also see the value in how Osprey has arranged things on the Quasar.

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Both bags have an adjustable waist strap that you can use to shift some of the bag's weight onto your core and hips. (Also great for feeling self-conscious about the proportions of your belly.) These straps need to be fairly snug for you to really enjoy any of their benefits; to make this easier, there are nice little loops on either end that. While these are functionally equivalent, I thought the loops on the Borealis were finished a little better, and the waist strap on the Borealis was a little wider/thicker, and so slightly more comfortable when worn and also slightly nicer to adjust.

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The Borealis and the Quasar both feature sternum straps that can be raised and lowered as well as tightened. They're basically identical, and both have whistles built into the clips. You may not think that's all that novel, but I hadn't shopped for backpacks since the 90s, so I commend bag makers for this very cool safety addition. Good job, y'all!

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There are some additional mount points on the shoulder straps of each bag. I found the little molle straps on the Quasar easier to work with.

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Both bags feature a small pocket near the top that's suitable for sunglasses and small electronics. The pocket on the Borealis is lined with super-duper soft material to prevent scratching up your specs, while the material on the Quasar is adequate but not quite so luxurious a home for its contents. These pockets are essentially identical in terms of size, so if pampering your stuff is a goal, the Borealis gets the points here, but I'd be willing to bet that this pocket on the Quasar does a little better in wet conditions.

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Each bag has two major compartments, accessible from a panel-style zipper that goes up and around like an upside-down U. The outermost of these compartments features each maker's take on some organization features, while the innermost is home to the bulk of the bag's storage.

Looking at the Borealis first, we have a nice variety of pockets in various pratical sizes, some padded and some mesh, with one zippered. The zippered pocket includes a little strap and clip to attach your keys; I appreciated being able to conceal keys in this pocket. The narrower of the two padded pockets is just right for a mobile phone, and the wider is a lovely home for a tablet (like my old, old iPad 2). There are also a couple more molle strap mount points to let you customize things a bit. Down at the bottom are spots for pens and pencils and mesh pockets just about right for a little pocket notebook.

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The Quasar, by contrast, is a little more barebones. Yes, there are some pen and pencil slots; yes, there are a couple of miscellaneous pockets; yes, there are a couple of stretchy mesh pockets; yes, there is a clip for your keys. But the clip doesn't hide away with the elgance of the Borealis, and nothing feels quite as well thought out as on the Borealis. I like that the color here makes it easier to find things, but the Borealis seems better organized in practically every other regard. That said, the Quasar does one thing here far, far better than the Borealis--access. Remember those compression straps? On the Borealis, the compression straps interfere with the zippers of both compartments. By contrast, the Quasar's straps only impede access to the main compartment, making access to this organized compartment far easier than on the Borealis.

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Finally, we come to the cavernous main compartments. Both bags have plenty of room here for you to load them up however you see fit. Here, though, the Borealis is the more spartan of the pair, with just a single, fairly plain laptop pocket with no additional padding. Even then, this slot was a disappointment, barely capable of holding my 13" Macbook Air clad in a neoprene sleeve. The Quasar shines here, including not only a padded laptop sleeve, but a second slim pocket for papers or a notebook, and a zippered mesh pocket that's great for power cords and video dongles. It was a breeze to insert or remove my Air, neoprene sleeve and all, and that mesh pocket is just the right size for my 7-inch Grid-It organizer. The Quasar wins here, and it wins by a lot.

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I don't have photos of the next bit, but I zipped both bags shut and sprayed them with water from a spray bottle, with particular emphasis on soaking the zippers themselves. Both bags admitted a little water, but the Quasar's zippers fared noticeably better than those on the Borealis. I was planning to get a rain cover regardless of which bag I selected (and I'm glad I did, because I needed it on a soaker of a night in London!) so this wasn't a big deal, but was definitely a point in the Quasar's favor.

At this point I was still vacillating between the two bags, mainly because of how both bags were great at one compartment but not at both. The deciding factor turned out to be something I can't capture in pictures: the carry. The feel of the bag, properly fitted and holding a typical load, on my body. The Borealis has much thicker padding for your back, but both that padding and the straps felt much stiffer than the Quasar. I'm sure that the Borealis would improve with time, or that I'd get used to it, but I was a little over a week out from flying to the UK, so that was time I didn't have. By contrast, the Quasar felt broken in from the moment I put it on. The straps were just right, and the padding didn't press into my back in weird ways like the Borealis did. So the Borealis went back to the warehouse and the Quasar went with me to England and Wales, where it performed marvelously.

I was so pleased with the Quasar that I've since picked up similar Osprey bags for my wife and daughter: the Questa for Liz, better fitted to feminine anatomy, and the Pogo for the kiddo, because the other child bags lacked the waist strap. The Pogo in particular has been nothing short of a miracle for the kid; the sternum and waist straps mean that she can carry her bag through the airport without complaint. As a parent, this is huge.

Ultimately, though, both of these bags are great choices, and I am not at all surprised by how many of each bag I've seen at tech conferences in the past year. It's a lot like the photographer's dilemma of choosing Canon or Nikon--it's hard to go wrong with either one, but you should try them out and decide for yourself.

Good luck, and happy daypacking!

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I Should Maybe Blog Sometime

Is this thing still on?

Gosh, I should maybe blog sometime. I actually do have a couple things that I've been meaning to write about, and it's a little embarrassing that I've barely posted a handful of updates over the past four years. FOUR YEARS!

So... Stay tuned, I guess, and we'll see how poorly this post ages.

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Text Me Maybe: Smarter Real-World Integrations with Python

Gosh, it's been a year since I last posted! Let me try to make it up to you...

I took some existing talks on the road last year (to CodeMash, PyCon, and OSCON!) but I've once again put together something new for PyOhio.

So my family likes to know when I'm on the way home from work, but I'm lousy at remembering to text or call before I leave. Some basic "out of the box" geofencing solutions are available, but none of them are smart enough to understand situations like going to lunch where sending a "coming home" message wouldn't be appropriate. Luckily, we can assemble our own solution pretty quickly and cheaply with Python at the core, and we don't even have to run our own servers to do it!

In this talk I showed how I created a cloud-hosted, location-triggered SMS notification service with some decision-making smarts by combining IFTTT (If This Then That), AWS Lambda, Twilio, and just the right amount of Python.

The talk seemed to go really well, and I have been flattered and humbled by the volume of positive feedback I got about it. I hope it will inspire you to go have some fun making your smart things a little smarter.

Here are the slides:

Unfortunately there's no video due to a variety of AV issues, so you'll either need to use your imagination or convince the PyCon program committee to accept it for 2017. ;-)

And who knows, maybe I'll start posting more often (hahahaahhahaahahahahahahaha *wipes away tears* whoooo wow, who am I kidding?).

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Using Python to Get Out the Vote

After taking a year off from PyOhio due to a scheduling snafu (off-by-one errors apparently aren't just for software), I was delighted to be back this year, and with a fresh talk to boot.

This spring, I helped my wife with the data munging aspect of a school levy get-out-the-vote campaign. We mashed up school directory data with Ohio voter registration records to produce targeted contact lists for phone calls, mailings, and door-to-door visits, reducing redundant contacts and eliminating wasted contacts.

The technology involved is pretty straightforward, involving a little bit of Python and some pretty basic SQLAlchemy and Alembic (in fact, it was my first serious dive into both SQLAlchemy and Alembic).

The talk seemed to go pretty well, and I had some great conversations about it afterwards. Hopefully it will be inspiring or at least of some value to folks looking to do some useful things with Python.

Here are the slides:

And you can watch the video too.

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PyCon 2016 Dates

I blanked on the dates for PyCon 2016 the other day, and Google was strangely silent on the subject, so here, for your reference (and my SEO benefit), are the dates for PyCon 2016:

  • Tutorials: May 28–29, 2016
  • Conference: May 30–June 1, 2016
  • Sprints: Starting June 2, 2016

This means the tutorials will be over a weekend, and the conference will be during the week instead of the other way around, and it'll be a holiday weekend. I'm looking forward to finding out what this does to the dynamic of the conference.

Hopefully I'll see you there--if I can remember the dates, that is.

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Announcing Procatindex

Replacements

If you're even a little bit like me, you think Procatinator is one of the Internet's greatest achievements. (If you don't know Procatinator, pop on over there for a minute or two and you'll know whether the rest of this post is for you or not.)

If, like me, you have favorite cat GIF/music mashups but can't recall their exact URLs when you're trying to wow your friends, then my latest silly website project is for you.

Behold: the Procatindex!!

Procatindex.com keeps a list of all the Procatinator cats, with titles pulled from the music videos used. The list is automatically refreshed when there's a new cat, and you can subscribe to the RSS feed to make sure you never miss the latest additions.

The site and the script that refreshes it were built in a couple of hours with Requests and Flask, which made short work of the task. (If you aren't familiar with these, you should check them out. Though I have mixed feelings about Flask, it's a wonderful go-to for quick web apps like this. And Requests has become something I can no longer live without.)

Hopefully this improves the effectiveness of your procatination. Enjoy!

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Since You've Been Gone

All Gone

To everyone who now has Kelly Clarkson stuck in your head, you're welcome. (I know what it is you see, for it is in my mind also.)

Thanks largely to last year's 365 project, I posted a record 382 entries here on the old blog in 2012. So it feels strange that this is only my third post for 2013--and I missed February entirely!

What the heck happened to me? Life!

  • The first half of January was dominated by CodeMash and the eight-hour Django tutorial that I helped put on.
  • Mid-January through mid-March were consumed by preparations for the half-day web app security tutorial that I presented at PyCon.
  • I've also been crazy-busy preparing for and running our company's annual Hack Day event. We did a whole secret agent theme, going so far as to produce some extremely low-budget but nonetheless epic video segments in the style of the Bond films. Our audio team even made us a theme song, which I'm not ashamed to admit I enjoyed playing on a loop on my phone while I walked around the office in a tuxedo during the event.
  • I've been building lots of Legos with my daughter! She rocks the Lego Friends sets on her own, and helps me with my Star Wars and Lord of the Rings sets.
  • Speaking of Lego Lord of the Rings, I kind of got hooked playing the Xbox version. So good...
  • I got a RaspberryPi at PyCon! So the kiddo and I have built a case for it out of her spare Legos, and I've shown her a little bit of Python and Scratch. Now we need to find a project, because she's really excited about building something with it. (Thanks, PyCon!)
  • I made a little URL shortener for my pirn.at domain before I realized that bit.ly does it all for free and then some. That's okay. It gave me a chance to learn about Flask. I'll probably write a little bit more about it at some point later.
  • I made a little RSS-to-Twitter gizmo to automatically tweet links to my blog, using my pirn.at shortener for links. I'll probably write a little bit about it too.
  • I got all excited at PyCon and made PythonIpsum, a lorem ipsum generator with a Python-flavored vocabulary. Patches welcome!
  • I've been bitten by the site refresh bug and have started tinkering on a responsive-ish layout so that this place won't look so daft on a phone.
  • I've got a photography backlog from CodeMash and PyCon that I hope to address shortly. And then I want to get back to shooting regularly (though I've got a case of gear fever, so right now I'm mostly obsessing about which lens I'd like to pick up).
  • The kiddo and I have been watching Clone Wars and Dr. Who together. She's been really enjoying watching them with me, and I've really enjoyed helping to counter the influence of the Princess Industrial Complex.

In short--death by bullet points! Hopefully with the big conference season behind me, I'll get back into the swing of things shortly and won't be quite so much of a stranger here.

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